Pacific Northwest

The Pacific Northwest is a diverse geographic region, dominated by several mountain ranges, including the Coast Mountains, the Cascade Range, the Olympic Mountains, the Columbia Mountains, and the Rocky Mountains.

Because many areas have plentiful rainfall and mild summers, the Pacific Northwest has some of North America’s most lush and extensive forests, which are extensively populated with Coast Douglas fir trees, the second tallest growing evergreen conifer on earth. The region also contains specimens of the tallest trees on earth, the coast redwoods, in southwestern Oregon, but the largest of these trees are located just south of the California border in northwestern California. Coastal forests in some areas are classified as temperate rain forest.

 

Sites to See:

 

Hiking:

Samuel Boardman Corridor State Park

This corridor is a 12 mile, forested, linear park with a rugged, steep coastline interrupted by small sand beaches.  This park was named in honor of Samuel H. Boardman, the first Oregon Parks superintendent.  He and others of his generation felt this shining coastline should be saved for the public.  What gems they gave us: admire the 300-year old sitka spruce trees, gaze at the amazing Arch Rock and Natural Bridges, and walk the 27 miles of Oregon Coast Trail that weave through the giant forests.

Seaside prairies, spectacular vistas, secluded cove beaches, rugged cliffs and forested sea stacks come one after the other throughout this park.  Stand and ponder the old shell middens and wonder what it was like to live in a Native American village by the Pacific Ocean.